top of page

Tierschutz Daisy Gruppe

Öffentlich·40 Mitglieder
Vadim Eagles
Vadim Eagles

Git: Learn Version Control With Git: A Step-by-... !FULL!



Git is a version control system that you download onto your computer. It is essential that you use Git if you want to collaborate with other developers on a coding project or work on your own project.




Git: Learn Version Control with Git: A step-by-...



This article is based on an online course I created that teaches Git version control called Git Learning Journey. It teaches the basics of Git version control which covers all of the above in much more depth and much more, including working with remote repositories, merging and rebasing.


This chapter will be about getting started with Git.We will begin by explaining some background on version control tools, then move on to how to get Git running on your system and finally how to get it set up to start working with.At the end of this chapter you should understand why Git is around, why you should use it and you should be all set up to do so.


The next major issue that people encounter is that they need to collaborate with developers on other systems.To deal with this problem, Centralized Version Control Systems (CVCSs) were developed.These systems (such as CVS, Subversion, and Perforce) have a single server that contains all the versioned files, and a number of clients that check out files from that central place. For many years, this has been the standard for version control.


Use version control to save your work and coordinate code changes across your team. Even if you're just a single developer, version control helps you stay organized as you fix bugs and develop new features. Version control keeps a history of your development so that you can review and even roll back to any version of your code with ease.


Git has a version of this workflow using terminology and commands unique to Git. Throughout this tutorial you'll learn about repositories, branches, commits, and pull requests.These terms might sound familiar if you've used a version control system like Team Foundation Version Control or Subversion, but they behave differently in Git.


Track, branch, merge, and manage code revisions with Git, the free and open source distributed version control system. Through a series of step-by-step tutorials, this practical guide quickly takes you from Git fundamentals to advanced techniques, and provides friendly yet rigorous advice for navigating Git's many functions. You'll learn how to work with everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency.


Version control helps teams solve these kinds of problems, tracking every individual change by each contributor and helping prevent concurrent work from conflicting. Changes made in one part of the software can be incompatible with those made by another developer working at the same time. This problem should be discovered and solved in an orderly manner without blocking the work of the rest of the team. Further, in all software development, any change can introduce new bugs on its own and new software can't be trusted until it's tested. So testing and development proceed together until a new version is ready.


Good version control software supports a developer's preferred workflow without imposing one particular way of working. Ideally it also works on any platform, rather than dictate what operating system or tool chain developers must use. Great version control systems facilitate a smooth and continuous flow of changes to the code rather than the frustrating and clumsy mechanism of file locking - giving the green light to one developer at the expense of blocking the progress of others.


Software teams that do not use any form of version control often run into problems like not knowing which changes that have been made are available to users or the creation of incompatible changes between two unrelated pieces of work that must then be painstakingly untangled and reworked. If you're a developer who has never used version control you may have added versions to your files, perhaps with suffixes like "final" or "latest" and then had to later deal with a new final version. Perhaps you've commented out code blocks because you want to disable certain functionality without deleting the code, fearing that there may be a use for it later. Version control is a way out of these problems.


Version control software is an essential part of the every-day of the modern software team's professional practices. Individual software developers who are accustomed to working with a capable version control system in their teams typically recognize the incredible value version control also gives them even on small solo projects. Once accustomed to the powerful benefits of version control systems, many developers wouldn't consider working without it even for non-software projects.


While it is possible to develop software without using any version control, doing so subjects the project to a huge risk that no professional team would be advised to accept. So the question is not whether to use version control but which version control system to use.


This course covers the essentials of using the version control system Git. You'll be able to create a new Git repo, commit changes, and review the commit history of an existing repo. You'll also learn how to keep your commits organized using tags and branches and you'll master the art of merging changes by crushing those pesky merge conflicts. Oh no! Was a mistake made along the way? Learn how to edit commits, revert changes, or even delete commits.


Version control is an incredibly important skill that every developer should master, and Git is one of the most popular version control systems used in the workforce. Whether you're working as a solo developer or working with a team, being able to track the history of a project is paramount. Tracking versions of your code will help you keep a record of progress and allow you to "undo" any blunders that occur along the way. This is incredibly important in a profession where 96% of developers say they work on a team of engineers all working on the same code and 67% of developers report having to check-in changes in their code at least once a day.


Version control is an incredibly important skill that every developer should master, and Git is one of the most popular version control systems used in the workforce. Whether you're working as a solo developer or working with a team, being able to track the history of a project is paramount. Tracking versions of your code will help you keep a record of progress and allow you to \"undo\" any blunders that occur along the way. This is incredibly important in a profession where 96% of developers say they work on a team of engineers all working on the same code and 67% of developers report having to check-in changes in their code at least once a day.


Version control allows you to keep track of your work and helps you to easily explore the changes you have made, be it data, coding scripts, notes, etc. You are probably already doing some type of version control, if you save multiple files, such as Dissertation_script_25thFeb.R, Dissertation_script_26thFeb.R, etc. This approach will leave you with tens or hundreds of similar files, making it rather cumbersome to directly compare different versions, and is not easy to share among collaborators. With version control software such as Git, version control is much smoother and easier to implement. Using an online platform like Github to store your files means that you have an online back up of your work, which is beneficial for both you and your collaborators.


Git uses the command line to perform more advanced actions and we encourage you to look through the extra resources we have added at the end of the tutorial later, to get more comfortable with Git. But until then, here we offer a gentle introduction to syncing RStudio and Github, so you can start using version control in minutes.


This workshop introduces the basic concepts of Git version control. Whether you're new to version control or just need an explanation of Git and GitHub, this two hour tutorial will help you understand the concepts of distributed version control. Get to know basic Git concepts and GitHub workflows through step-by-step lessons. We'll even rewrite a bit of history, and touch on how to undo (almost) anything with Git. This is a class for users who are comfortable with a command-line interface.


Git was revolutionary because it introduced the world to the first powerful distributed version control system. "Distributed" means that Git doesn't recognize any specific repository as special or different than any other. Teams of developers can exchange work directly with each other if desired instead of relying on designated centralized repositories.


Learn Version Control with Git is an excellent choice for any aspiring developer to learn version control. The author, Tobias Günther, explains the importance of version control systems, specifically Git. You will learn key Git features and workflows. Your understanding will be enhanced with high-quality charts and graphics.


Author Francois Dupire challenges developers, of all levels, to learn the ins-and-outs of Git. Help your team succeed by understanding the correct command for each situation, without needing to consult Google. This book starts with the most fundamental basics and assumes the reader has no experience with Git or other version control systems.


Git for Teams acts as an invaluable guide to navigate team dynamics, improve team collaboration, and incorporate team building. Learn techniques for handling code reviews and the best ways to structure your workflows. Git for Teams will change your interaction with Git and repository hosting platforms like GitHub, by approaching version control in a completely different manner.


Author: Emma Jane Hogbin Westby has over 20 years of experience with web technologies and now teaches courses and workshops covering version control, change management, and virtualization among others.


Advanced Git (Second Edition): Understanding Git Collaboration & Workflows is designed for any reader with a solid introductory understanding of Git, looking to move onto advanced topics. You will learn how Git works on the backend, how to handle merge conflicts, plus rebasing and squashing. Let this book demystify any of these misunderstood topics, so you tackle any tricky version control issues you encounter. 041b061a72


Info

Willkommen in der Gruppe! Hier können sich Mitglieder austau...

Mitglieder

  • Lisa Kamleitner
    Lisa Kamleitner
  • M
    miinguyen396
  • P
    phocohanoi2
  • T
    trankhoa856325
  • T
    tramanh3004123
bottom of page